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In Defence of the Generalists

Words and Images by Dave Brosha

As far as photography terms goes, the word generalist is about as unsexy as it comes. Professional Adventure Photographer: now that’s a label with some real-life “ooh” and “aah” factor. Boudoir Photographer: instant visions of scantily-clad people very comfortable in their skin. Even Industrial Photographer brings visions of football-field size shiny processing plants, being able to wear a safety harness while shooting off some elevated platform or heading into the deeps of the Earth, photographing underground mining with a hard hat and a cap-lamp. That’s some cool photography, right there. Right?

Look for Clean and Simple

By Dave Brosha

The longer you’re in photography, the more you train your eye to look for clean compositions and the more you think about what NOT to include in your images, rather than what to include. Most of us tend to include way too much in our images when we start photography, with no clear, concise point of interest of the subject.

A challenge you can give yourself in any situation – no matter what genre of photography you love shooting – is to ask, before pressing the shutter: What do I want to express with this image? Is it the emotion? The story? The contrast? Something specifically beautiful or powerful within the scene?

Photography and COVID-19: Thoughts on Weathering the Storm

Written by Meghan J. Ward
Feature photo by Paul Zizka

You had ideas, dreams, business plans. You had a bucket list of places you wanted to photograph, some gigs booked, a conference you were looking forward to attending. You had a sense of possibility, of growth, of a bright future; that all your hard work was coming to fruition.

Then, COVID-19 changed everything. Everything.

What’s a photographer to do?

northern lights shimmer through cloudy skies and over a mountain range bordering a frozen lake

OFFBEAT Contributor Feature: Kahli Hindmarsh

We recently had a chance to catch up with OFFBEAT contributor and night, landscape, and adventure photographer, Kahli Hindmarsh, to find out more about her photography business, creative inspiration, and wisdom she’d like to share with new photographers. Originally from Australia, Kahli now resides in Canmore, Alberta, and, naturally, she can usually be found outdoors, exploring and searching for intriguing scenes in interesting light.

Photo by Elizabeth Gadd Photography.

Going The Extra Mile

By Lizzie Gadd

I’ve heard it said among landscape photographers, “Keep walking until you see what you want to see”. Get past the distracting objects. Go further than the norm. Go the extra mile to find that perfect perspective.

The same sort of mindset can be applied to any type of photography. I remember realizing about eight years ago how much of a difference it makes to take that extra step with each shoot. To come up with ideas on how to bump a photo from mediocre to awesomeness.

The Mobile Blind

By Colleen Gara

My favourite way to photograph wildlife is on foot, whether hiking or snowshoeing, or walking out to a quiet spot in the woods to sit and wait.

But sometimes, circumstances such as the proximity of the animal, type of animal, or weather can prevent me from venturing out too far. This is when my ‘mobile blind’ comes in super handy. A blind is a shelter (usually camouflaged) that is used to observe and photograph wildlife and often I will use my car as a type of blind, allowing me to photograph wildlife both safely and discreetly.

Finding Your Niche

By Lizzy Gadd

When I look at my work now, I admit I do feel very fortunate to have somehow fallen into this niche of ethereal self-portraiture/landscape mixtures that, I humbly also admit, I am kind of proud of.

It was a long process getting there. I don’t really know how it happened. But the moment I found it, it felt right. It’s what speaks to me, being able to express myself, and my love of nature, together. And so I’ve been doing exactly that for nine years now, and it still feels right.