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OFFBEAT Contributor Feature: CURTIS JONES

All images by Curtis.

“My favourite images are often created on the edge of discomfort.”

OFFBEAT recently had a chance to catch up with OFFBEAT Contributor, Curtis Jones. Always entertaining and inspiring, Curtis fills us in on his relationship with photography, his tips for beginners, overcoming challenges, how to get out of creative ruts, and more!

The Continual Location Hunt

By Maggie Hood

Choosing a location for a portrait shoot can set the tone and dictate the whole outcome of a shoot. The right location will fit the desired mood, have great light, and create an environment where clients can relax. Few things are more frustrating than shooting in terrible light in a busy spot where subjects are distracted or feeling like they are being watched by bystanders. Discovering locations in your area that fit your style, have great light, and provide a relaxed environment is important for portrait photographers. In my experience, clients generally are open to the photographer’s suggestions on where to shoot and sometimes only give a location style preference (i.e rustic vs modern). Having a small bank of location ideas to share with clients makes it easier and allows you to produce solid, consistent results for your clients.

A Guide to Family Photography for the Introverted Photographer

By Ashley Soeder

In past articles, my focus has been on photographing moments within my own home. People I am familiar with, in spaces I know, in areas I can move and manipulate to my liking. Although I don’t take on a huge amount of client sessions it is still something that I feel not only passionate about but something that has helped me grow as a photographer in ways I can’t quite get from shooting solely personal work. Client family photography work is the thing for me that almost ended before it even really started. A self-proclaimed introvert, socially awkward, observing in the background. My idea of a family photographer was someone the exact opposite of all those things. 

“Client work isn’t for me. I’m not very good at it. It brings unnecessary stress into my life. I’m not doing it. My focus will be on personal work, and I’m okay with that” – Ashley circa 2018

Being Prepared is Being Professional

By Wayne Simpson

I remember when I first started out using lighting in portraiture – it was nerve-wracking! I recall things going wrong and I would just keep trying things blindly until something worked. Many times, I had no idea what I had changed or why it worked… but it worked and I got the hell out of there as soon as I knew I had what I needed!

Things happen. Lights fail, transmitters don’t communicate, random unwanted light appears in photos. Heck, I’ve seen it all! The difference now is that I have a plan A, B, C, and sometimes D! Knowing various ways to approach a shoot is not only a great way to be sure you don’t let a client down, but it also brings your stress level down BIG TIME!