fbpx

6 Tips for Stronger Seascapes

By Curtis Jones

Your skin tingles with the almost imperceptible drop in temperature as you step out from the forest canopy. A low growl rises on a damp wind alluding to something powerful, something primal just out of view. With every step, you feel anticipation building in your chest, mirroring the energy of the waves formed miles off the coast. Gulls surf turquoise surges, pitching with each new push; taking flight just long enough to wait out the biggest of rollers, before settling back down for another set. Somewhere on the horizon, a storm is building. You know, even before the brooding clouds move in, you can smell the change in the air. Breaking over a low rise you catch the first glimpse of your saltwater quarry. With the sun hanging low, yellow light dances over the dark undulating water, giving it the appearance of liquid gold. The sea has many tales to tell, what will yours be?

Look for Clean and Simple

By Dave Brosha

The longer you’re in photography, the more you train your eye to look for clean compositions and the more you think about what NOT to include in your images, rather than what to include. Most of us tend to include way too much in our images when we start photography, with no clear, concise point of interest of the subject.

A challenge you can give yourself in any situation – no matter what genre of photography you love shooting – is to ask, before pressing the shutter: What do I want to express with this image? Is it the emotion? The story? The contrast? Something specifically beautiful or powerful within the scene?

14 Tips for Capturing Beautiful Sunrises/Sunsets

by Kahli Hindmarsh

There’s nothing better than seeing the sky explode with a colourful sunrise and knowing it was worth getting out of bed early for. But a lot of the time it can feel like a bit of a gamble, will it or won’t it light up. As fun as it is losing hours of sleep, driving to the location only to be met with dull/overcast conditions… there are some pretty reliable tricks you can use to ensure you get it right, more often.

Ice climbing under the lights at the Athabasca Glacier, Jasper National Park.

Best Tips for Editing Images of Northern Lights

By Paul Zizka

What are the best tricks for editing my photos of the northern lights?

It’s a frequently asked question that I get, so I thought I’d share a few tips! I find it’s so easy to make a mess out of aurora shots. Looking back at old images, I often went overboard with the sliders. I now prefer an approach to editing that is not as heavy-handed.

The Mobile Blind

By Colleen Gara

My favourite way to photograph wildlife is on foot, whether hiking or snowshoeing, or walking out to a quiet spot in the woods to sit and wait.

But sometimes, circumstances such as the proximity of the animal, type of animal, or weather can prevent me from venturing out too far. This is when my ‘mobile blind’ comes in super handy. A blind is a shelter (usually camouflaged) that is used to observe and photograph wildlife and often I will use my car as a type of blind, allowing me to photograph wildlife both safely and discreetly.

Finding Your Niche

By Lizzy Gadd

When I look at my work now, I admit I do feel very fortunate to have somehow fallen into this niche of ethereal self-portraiture/landscape mixtures that, I humbly also admit, I am kind of proud of.

It was a long process getting there. I don’t really know how it happened. But the moment I found it, it felt right. It’s what speaks to me, being able to express myself, and my love of nature, together. And so I’ve been doing exactly that for nine years now, and it still feels right.

Being Prepared is Being Professional

By Wayne Simpson

I remember when I first started out using lighting in portraiture – it was nerve-wracking! I recall things going wrong and I would just keep trying things blindly until something worked. Many times, I had no idea what I had changed or why it worked… but it worked and I got the hell out of there as soon as I knew I had what I needed!

Things happen. Lights fail, transmitters don’t communicate, random unwanted light appears in photos. Heck, I’ve seen it all! The difference now is that I have a plan A, B, C, and sometimes D! Knowing various ways to approach a shoot is not only a great way to be sure you don’t let a client down, but it also brings your stress level down BIG TIME!